Elizabeth I Becomes Queen

November 22, 2016 · Posted in Royal History, This Day in History · Comments Off on Elizabeth I Becomes Queen 

On November 17, 1558 at the age of 25, Elizabeth I became Queen taking over the throne from her half-sister Mary I, who died after a brief reign of only five years; they share a common father in King Henry VIII of England.

Elizabeth’s sister was given the unflattering moniker of “Bloody Mary” because of the protestants executed, or at the very least persecuted and imprisoned, under her Catholic rule.

Elizabeth I, in contrast to her sister’s short rule, was Queen for over 44 years. Her start in life was tragic. Her mother Anne Boleyn (the second wife of Henry VIII and as such the Queen of England) was found guilty of high treason on May 15, 1536 and beheaded four days later when Elizabeth was only two and a half years of age.

Elizabeth’s father the King had his marriage to Anne annulled and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate stripping away her title as princess and replaced with Lady Elizabeth.

But despite her dire beginnings that would have defeated most, it did not stop Elizabeth I from becoming one of our most admired and iconic Queens. Her time of reign is known as The Elizabethan era. Upon becoming Queen she made her intentions known. Her speech (Full document reproduced by Loades, 36–37. ) below:

My lords, the law of nature moves me to sorrow for my sister; the burden that is fallen upon me makes me amazed, and yet, considering I am God’s creature, ordained to obey His appointment, I will thereto yield, desiring from the bottom of my heart that I may have assistance of His grace to be the minister of His heavenly will in this office now committed to me. And as I am but one body naturally considered, though by His permission a body politic to govern, so shall I desire you all … to be assistant to me, that I with my ruling and you with your service may make a good account to Almighty God and leave some comfort to our posterity on earth. I mean to direct all my actions by good advice and counsel.

History Today: The Alamo

February 24, 2016 · Posted in America, This Day in History · Comments Off on History Today: The Alamo 

Texas was once a Mexican state, when a push for independence from within became strong; a desire to be free from the rule of the Mexican government. Colonel William Travis was seen as a vital leader of this uprising.

The Texas revolution began in 1835 and in February of 1836 Travis was appointed as a lieutenant colonel of the San Antonio troops.

It was on February 23, that a surprise arrival of the Mexican army under General Santa Ana sent the Texas troops retreating into the old Spanish mission, the Alamo. It was there that they sought refuge from the 5,000 soldiers of the Mexican army. The Alamo defenders were 186 small.

Knowing they were seriously outnumbered, Travis sent word for help, in more than one message, using couriers. One message became particularly famous addressed to “The People of Texas and All Americans in the World” and signed “Victory or Death.”

On March 6, death came for the defenders, including Travis, who were killed when the Mexican troops stormed the Alamo. The defenders however did not die in vain. The battle cry “Remember the Alamo” led the remaining Texas revolutionaries to eventual victory and by April they had won their independence.

As an added note to my post on the Alamo, my  friend and historian, William Welge, who lived in San Antonio, added these interesting facts:

There were exactly 186 defenders of the Alamo along with several dozen women and children. The women and children were spared by General Santa Ana.  The Alamo was built in 1718 when San Antonio was first founded. The mission grounds were much larger than what one sees today.

 

 

1951 Historic Flooding in Kansas

July 13, 2015 · Posted in Disasters, This Day in History · Comments Off on 1951 Historic Flooding in Kansas 

History making flood devastates Kansas on July 13, 1951.

500,000 people were left homeless and 24 people died. The Midwestern United States had not seen such destruction from flooding as great as this, since record taking had begun.

It was on the unluckiest of days, Friday the 13th, that some call Black Friday, when the flood swept down the Kansas River valley and into the Missouri River basin.

Above-average rainfall beginning in June and lasting through July 13th brought well over 25 inches to towns in eastern Kansas. Most affected major towns were Manhattan, Topeka and Lawrence. Also, 10,000 farms were destroyed as well.

The crest of the flood exceeded all previous highs by four to nine feet on July 13th, 1951.

Kansas Flood 1951

Source http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218671

 

Sources:

Kansas Historical Society

History.com

The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956

December 28, 2014 · Posted in Famous Writers, Historic Crimes, Russian History, This Day in History · Comments Off on The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956 

The first volume of The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956, a history and memoir of life in a Soviet Union prison camp, written by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, was first published in Paris in the original Russian on Dec 28, 1973.

“… authorized for Western publication only after the Soviet secret police seized a copy of the manuscript last August, …”

The Soviets arrested Solzhenitsyn on February 12, 1974 taking away his citizenship and deporting him.

Solzhenitsyn warned the Russian people, citizens of a severely, censorial, 1973 Russia, in the preface of his book The Gulag Archipelago (a three-volume work), that they must consider the reading of his writings as a “very dangerous” act.

Learn more about life in Stalin’s Gulag.

Jonas Salk’s 100th Birthday

October 26, 2014 · Posted in Medicine, Science, This Day in History · Comments Off on Jonas Salk’s 100th Birthday 

The History of Polio is forever and inextricably linked with  Jonas Salk . Salk’s eagerly anticipated achievement of inoculation against the much feared polio virus was made public on April 12, 1955

Not long after the announcement of the success of the Salk Vaccine , Jonas appeared in what would become a well-known television interview with Edward R. Murrow. When Murrow asked why he did not obtain a patent on his medical discovery, Salk famously said in response, “Would you patent the sun?” His response left the impression that it was a morally motivated decline on Salk’s part that resulted in an unpatented invention. But there are other details that point to the possibility of an altogether different reason having less to do with Salk and more to do with other factors  apart from Salk’s refusal to apply for a patent.

October 28, 1914 marks the 100th anniversary of Jonas Salk’s birthday.

1985 Interview with Salk

IBM Introduces the System/360

April 7, 2014 · Posted in Firsts in History, Science, This Day in History · Comments Off on IBM Introduces the System/360 

May the computers unite and with that revolutionary concept the IBM System/360 was born. Before the uniting of computers into a network of systems, each was its own creation uniquely customized for each of IBM’s clients.

It has been 50 years since the 360 mainframe was introduced in 1964. It boasted the first mainframe computers that IBM customers could optimize from a lower cost model to something upgraded in power. ABC News

 

 

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