1951 Historic Flooding in Kansas

July 13, 2015 · Posted in Disasters, This Day in History · Comments Off on 1951 Historic Flooding in Kansas 

History making flood devastates Kansas on July 13, 1951.

500,000 people were left homeless and 24 people died. The Midwestern United States had not seen such destruction from flooding as great as this, since record taking had begun.

It was on the unluckiest of days, Friday the 13th, that some call Black Friday, when the flood swept down the Kansas River valley and into the Missouri River basin.

Above-average rainfall beginning in June and lasting through July 13th brought well over 25 inches to towns in eastern Kansas. Most affected major towns were Manhattan, Topeka and Lawrence. Also, 10,000 farms were destroyed as well.

The crest of the flood exceeded all previous highs by four to nine feet on July 13th, 1951.

Kansas Flood 1951

Source http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/218671

 

Sources:

Kansas Historical Society

History.com

Top Ten Deadliest Tornadoes in Oklahoma History

October 2, 2014 · Posted in Disasters, Oklahoma History, Weather · Comments Off on Top Ten Deadliest Tornadoes in Oklahoma History 
Rank City Date Scale Fatalities Injuries
1 Woodward 4/9/1947 F5 116 782
2 Snyder 5/10/1905 F5 97* 58*
3 Peggs 5/2/1920 F4 71 100
4 Antlers 4/12/1945 F5 69 353
5 Pryor 4/27/1942 F4 52 350
6 (Bridge Creek-Newcastle-Moore-Oklahoma City) 5/3/1999 F5 36 583
7 Oklahoma City 6/12/1942 F4 35 100
8 Cleveland County 04/25/1893 F4 33 ~100
9 (Newcastle-South Oklahoma City-Moore) 5/20/2013 EF5 24
10 Bethany 11/19/1930 F4 23 150

Source: National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office, Norman, OK

Tornado History

June 5, 2013 · Posted in Disasters, Oklahoma History, Weather · Comments Off on Tornado History 

el-reno-tornado

It has been confirmed that the Friday, May 31, 2013 tornado, that brought destruction and death to El Reno, OK, was the widest ever in recorded history. Per the National Weather Service and a leading researcher, Howard Bluestein, no other tornado has ever reached such a mammoth breadth. The El Reno tornado stretched a maximum width of 2.6 miles.

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Pacific Ring of Fire a Volatile Place

February 6, 2013 · Posted in Disasters, Earthquakes, Volcanoes · Comments Off on Pacific Ring of Fire a Volatile Place 
pacific_ring_of_fire_map

public domain image http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/text/fire.html

 
The Aleutian island chain, Andes mountains of South America and the Micronesia tropics make up  the geographical region known as the “Ring of Fire.” Plates underlying these areas on the Earth are made up of subduction zones. These are zones where oceanic tectonic plate go under a continental plate or another oceanic plate. This results in the increased volcanic and earthquake activity we have seen throughout history in this aptly named “Pacific Ring of Fire”.

The Solomon Islands are a part of this geographically volitile place, which saw a magnitude 8 earthquake in its nearby region today, Febuary 6, 2013, and has resulted in a Tsunami warning.

Tsunamis are the sometimes seen side effect when earthquakes rattle the ocean. See the definition of what a tsunami means: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tsunami

Source: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/savageearth/hellscrust/html/sidebar3.html ; http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/431920/20130206/earthquake-tsunami-australia-solomon-islands.htm

Super Earthquakes in History

February 6, 2013 · Posted in Disasters, Earthquakes · Comments Off on Super Earthquakes in History 
1. Chile 1960 05 22 9.5 -38.29 -73.05 Kanamori, 1977
2. Prince William Sound, Alaska 1964 03 28 9.2 61.02 -147.65 Kanamori, 1977
3. Off the West Coast of Northern Sumatra 2004 12 26 9.1 3.30 95.78 Park et al., 2005
4. Near the East Coast of Honshu, Japan 2011 03 11 9.0 38.322 142.369 PDE
5. Kamchatka 1952 11 04 9.0 52.76 160.06 Kanamori, 1977
6. Offshore Maule, Chile 2010 02 27 8.8 -35.846 -72.719 PDE
7. Off the Coast of Ecuador 1906 01 31 8.8 1.0 -81.5 Kanamori, 1977
8. Rat Islands, Alaska 1965 02 04 8.7 51.21 178.50 Kanamori, 1977
9. Northern Sumatra, Indonesia 2005 03 28 8.6 2.08 97.01 PDE
10. Assam – Tibet 1950 08 15 8.6 28.5 96.5 Kanamori, 1977
11. Off the west coast of northern Sumatra 2012 04 11 8.6 2.311 93.063 PDE
12. Andreanof Islands, Alaska 1957 03 09 8.6 51.56 -175.39 Johnson et al., 1994
13. Southern Sumatra, Indonesia 2007 09 12 8.5 -4.438 101.367 PDE
14. Banda Sea, Indonesia 1938 02 01 8.5 -5.05 131.62 Okal and Reymond, 2003
15. Kamchatka 1923 02 03 8.5 54.0 161.0 Kanamori, 1988
16. Chile-Argentina Border 1922 11 11 8.5 -28.55 -70.50 Kanamori, 1977
17. Kuril Islands 1963 10 13 8.5 44.9 149.6 Kanamori, 1977
Updated 2012 April 11

Source: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/10_largest_world.php

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