Black History Month

February 3, 2017 · Posted in Black History, Civil Rights · Comments Off on Black History Month 

It was Dec. 1, 1955 on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama that Rosa Parks, a NAACP member, bravely refused to move to the back of the bus. She refused to allow a white man to have her seat on the bus.

We often imagine that one individual citizen of the United States cannot make a difference. We give up before even trying. Believing that without large sums of money and powerful political backing it is an impossibility that one individual’s action can lead to change.

Thankfully we have the remarkable example of Rosa Parks. She reminds us of the power one person has to make a stand against social injustice. Her single act of determination to stand up, or in this case to stay sitting down, in the face of a  violent, even murderous, and intimidating society of racism could and did make a change. We must remember that this was no ordinary act of protest. The society of racism in Montgomery, Alabama was a formidable foe. The threat was very real. Many were willing and ready to  murder innocent people to maintain white power and privilege, where blacks are conveniently relegated, literally to the back of the bus, into a state of dehumanization.

Her arrest report can be found here.

Conditions of Hong Kong Reverting to Chinese Rule

August 31, 2014 · Posted in Civil Rights · Comments Off on Conditions of Hong Kong Reverting to Chinese Rule 

Talks began in 1982 between Margaret Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping that would determine the future fate of Hong Kong. Prime Minister Thatcher flew to Peking (Beijing the capital of the People’s Republic of China) in September 1982 in hopes of retaining Hong Kong as British, but she failed in her attempt.

Two years later in 1984 the signing between China and Britain of a “Joint Declaration” permitted that China would take back Hong Kong in 1997. Thatcher insisted on the inclusion of certain contingencies, being that during the 50 years following China’s take back of sovereignty, Hong Kong must remain a special administrative region; meaning Hong Kong SAR would be a separate system in two respects retaining its capitalist economy and a partial democratic political system.

But Thatcher from her own words revealed her thoughts and feelings regarding the chances for this “one country, two systems” success. Only continued British administration – British ‘rule’, she said – could guarantee Hong Kong’s well-being beyond 1997.

Proving her premonition we read today that in fact Mainlaind China is chipping away at Hong Kong’s democracy by limitting the people’s electoral choices to be only those first approved by China, which of course is not a true free election by the people and for the people. Many Hong Kong people are protesting this violation of their rights. We will watch to see how things will play out in the years to come.
Tags: Hong Kong SAR, China’s Take Back of Hong Kong, Margaret Thatcher, Hong Kong Democracy

Source: ( http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/how-mrs-thatcher-lost-hong-kong-ten-years-ago-fired-up-by-her-triumph-in-the-falklands-war-margaret-thatcher-flew-to-peking-for-a-lastditch-attempt-to-keep-hong-kong-under-british-rule–only-to-meet-her-match-in-deng-xiaoping-two-years-later-she-signed-the-agreement-handing-the-territory-to-china-1543375.html)

Folk Singer Pete Seeger Dies

June 18, 2014 · Posted in America, Civil Rights, Famous Song Writers and Singers · Comments Off on Folk Singer Pete Seeger Dies 

Known for such popular hit songs: “If I Had a Hammer,” “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” and “Kisses Sweeter Than Wine” and anthem for civil rights, “We Shall Overcome.”  has died at the age of 94.

Read More

 

Ole Miss Riot

March 13, 2014 · Posted in Black History, Civil Rights, This Day in History · Comments Off on Ole Miss Riot 

On Oct. 1, 1962 Mississippi University admitted James Meredith; their first black student.  This Federally ordered act of integration resulted in a violent mob riot on the campus. Two people were killed and hundreds injured. Mississippi had segregationist laws that Governor Ross Barnett tried to uphold despite President Kennedy’s order to obey the federal law against segregation. The fight to preserve James Meredith’s civil right to attend the University of Mississippi is sometimes referred to as “the last battle of the Civil War”.

Learn more about the facts and people involved.

Remembering Rosa Parks

December 2, 2013 · Posted in Black History, Civil Rights, This Day in History · Comments Off on Remembering Rosa Parks 

It was 58 years ago today Dec. 1, 1955 on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama that Rosa Parks, an NAACP member, bravely refused to move to the back of the bus. She refused to allow a white man to have her seat on the bus.

We often imagine that one individual citizen of the United States, cannot make a difference. We give up before even trying believing that without large sums of money and powerful political backing it is an impossibility for our simple effort to succeed.

Thankfully we have the remarkable example of Rosa Parks. She reminds us of the power one person has to make a stand against social injustice. Her single act of determination to stand up, or in this case to stay sitting down, in the face of a  violent, even murderous, and intimidating society of racism could and did make a change. We must remember that this was no ordinary act of protest. The society of racism in Montgomery, Alabama was a formidable foe. They were willing and ready to  murder innocent people to maintain white power and privilege, where blacks are conveniently relegated into a state of dehumanization.

Her arrest report can be found here.

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