Book: Mardi J. Horowitz, M.D.

Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy Mardi J. Horowitz, M.D. Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry University of California San Francisco, CA, USA

Horowitz, Mardi J. (2016-05-03). Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy (Kindle Locations 10-12). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.

Chapter 1 “The benefits of personality growth include a more coherent identity; increased capacity for richer, deeper, and more enduring relationships; and improved emotional control, including tolerance for negative feelings such as fear and sadness. Psychotherapy can assist in personality growth…”

“The therapist then considers the emotions that may lead to changes in mental states, such as into defensive states or disorganized states of extreme distress. These are labeled “topics of concern.”
(Kindle Locations 188-189). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.
“This tense state then contrasted with his apathetic or aloof state of mind, which was achieved and stabilized when he was able to avoid others either by working alone in his office cubicle or by delving into solitary interests and hobbies. Silver desired a state he termed happiness. “
Horowitz, Mardi J. (2016-05-03). Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy (Kindle Locations 199-202). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.”

Topics of concern Transitions into under- over-controlled states may occur with the emergence of certain topics that bring up emotions that are difficult for the patient, and perhaps even the therapist, to experience. A topic may return again and again because it is important, conflictual, and unresolved. It may be avoided for a while before it returns as a topic to be discussed.

Horowitz, Mardi J. (2016-05-03). Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy (Kindle Locations 219-221). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.
His hypervigilance for rejection often superseded his desire for intimacy, prompting Silver to wall himself off from others and enter his calmer but unsatisfying state of apathy and aloofness. This helped Silver regulate both his experience of tension and his sense of degradation, but it also left him lonely. When that became a depressive state, Silver would once again venture to connect with others, but the cyclic pattern described would unfold once
Horowitz, Mardi J. (2016-05-03). Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy (Kindle Locations 227-230). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.
One way Silver avoided entry into the potentially under-modulated state of shame was to focus attention on the other person’s shortcomings: he would deny any desire to make a deeper connection with such a person, and judge them as an unsatisfactory potential companion. If there had been an argument, Silver presented the incident implying that the other person was at fault. In
Horowitz, Mardi J. (2016-05-03). Adult Personality Growth in Psychotherapy (Kindle Locations 236-239). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.