Research History

Today in History November 11

World War I ends, 1918 American Revolution Poor leadership leads to Cherry Valley Massacre, 1778 Automotive The General Lee jumps into history, 1978 Civil War Confederate General Benjamin McCulloch is born, 1811 Cold War Soviet Union refuses to play Chile in World Cup Soccer, 1973 Crime Police make a grisly discovery in Dorothea Puente’s lawn,…

Led Zeppelin IV hits Its 40th anniversary

It was exactly forty years ago today (November 8) that Led Zeppelin IV was released to the world.IV wasn’t the official title for the album. The title was in symbols and it became known as symbols, IV and Zoso depending on who you talked to. IV was Led Zeppelin’s biggest album, selling over 32 million…

Oklahoma Hit by Earthquake

November 6, 2011 Oklahoma Hit by Earthquake for a Second Night in a Row   By SARAH MASLIN NIR For the second night in a row, an earthquake rattled Central Oklahoma late Saturday night, waking residents, breaking dishes and generally startling people more accustomed to natural disasters from above than from below their feet. The…

Sistine Chapel ceiling opens to public

Nov 1, 1512 The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, one of Italian artist Michelangelo’s finest works, is exhibited to the public for the first time. Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest of the Italian Renaissance artists, was born in the small village of Caprese in 1475. The son of a government administrator, he grew up…

Lady Liberty gets high-tech on 125th birthday Friday, October 28, 2011

NEW YORK (KABC) — The Statue of Liberty turns 125 Friday, and the iconic structure is being celebrated with a high-tech facelift. Internet-connected cameras have been installed around the torch to offer a different view of New York City. The city will be hosting festivities all day to commemorate the Statue of Liberty’s dedication on…

Magic Mystery Treasure

in the November 2011 issue of National Geographic The Staffordshire Hoard, as it was quickly dubbed, electrified the general public and Anglo-Saxon scholars alike. Spectacular discoveries, such as the royal finds at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, had been made in Anglo-Saxon burial sites. But the treasure pulled from Fred Johnson’s field was novel—a cache of…