Banting and Best isolate insulin 1922

In 1920, Canadian surgeon Frederick Banting visited the University of Toronto to speak to the newly appointed head of the department of physiology, John J.R. Macleod. Macleod had studied glucose metabolism and diabetes, and Banting had a new idea on how to find not only the cause but a treatment for the so-called “sugar disease.” Late […]

Share
Continue reading →

Accidental Discoveries by Lexi Krock

Accidental Discoveries by Lexi Krock PBS NOVA Accidents in medicine: The idea sends chills down your spine as you conjure up thoughts of misdiagnoses, mistakenly prescribed drugs, and wrongly amputated limbs. Yet while accidents in the examining room or on the operating table can be regrettable, even tragic, those that occur in the laboratory can […]

Share
Continue reading →

The Yellow Fever Epidemic in Philadelphia, 1793

Observations Upon the Origin of the Malignant Bilious, or Yellow Fever in Philadelphia. From the holdings of Center for the History of Medicine/Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine—Harvard Medical School. Yellow fever is known for bringing on a characteristic yellow tinge to the eyes and skin, and for the terrible “black vomit” caused by bleeding […]

Share
Continue reading →

Tuberculosis in Europe and North America, 1800–1922

Poincaré, Émile Léon. Prophylaxie et géographie médicale :des principales maladies tributaires de l’hygiène. From the holdings of Center for the History of Medicine/Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine—Harvard Medical School. Tuberculosis, also known as “consumption,” “phthisis,” or the “white plague,” was the cause of more deaths in industrialized countries than any other disease during the […]

Share
Continue reading →

Tropical Diseases and the Construction of the Panama Canal, 1904–1914

The Mosquito: Its Relation to Disease and Its Extermination. From the holdings of Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine—Harvard Medical School. The Hay–Bunau–Varilla Treaty of 1903 created the Panama Canal Zone and allowed the US government to begin building its 51–mile waterway through the Isthmus of Panama in May 1904. The transoceanic waterway opened in […]

Share
Continue reading →

Syphilis, 1494–1923

Syphilis, 1494–1923 Des Inoculations Syphilitiques. From the holdings of Center for the History of Medicine/Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine—Harvard Medical School. Syphilis was first reported in Europe in 1494 among soldiers (and their camp followers) involved in a war between France and Naples. The disease was striking in two ways: for its unpleasantness and […]

Share
Continue reading →